Butterfly Diary 2016, Week 2

A little girl asked why one butterfly didn't have eyes and I said it did, but they were black ... like this one's

Butterfly on a tropical plant

This week I’ll largely post photos. That’s what most people want anyway.

There was a lot of emergence in this, the first full week of Dow Gardens’ Butterflies in Bloom. We also had three mating pairs, which I haven’t seen this early on. For the most part people kept a respectful distance, but one woman plucked a mating pair off a marigold when I was busy elsewhere and put them on her toddler grandson to photograph. SERIOUSLY? Like you’d want to be bothered that way. And no, they were not at all inclined to separate; I don’t know how long they go at it, but some of them remained fond of each other for my entire 2-hour shift.

Mating swallowtails
Mating great yellow Mormon and swallowtail
Mating swallowtails
Same pair, side view
A zebra longwing on one of the marigolds brought into the conservatory for the butterflies
A zebra longwing on one of the marigolds brought into the conservatory for the butterflies
A trio at one of the food dishes
A trio at one of the food dishes
A Mexican bluewing whose coloring is more of a light violet than the usual cobalt blue
A Mexican bluewing whose coloring is more of a light violet than the usual cobalt blue
A starry night cracker, one of my favorite varieties
A starry night cracker, one of my favorite varieties
A different starry night cracker, sharing a banana
A different starry night cracker, sharing a banana
Another of our smaller varieties, a buckeye
Another of our smaller varieties, a buckeye
Somewhat larger, a malachite
Somewhat larger, a malachite
A swallowtail without one of its telltale "tails"
A great yellow Mormon without one of its telltale swallow”tails”
Same variety, different specimen; note the two "tails"
Same variety, different specimen; note the two “tails”
A little girl asked why one butterfly didn't have eyes and I said it did, but they were black ... like this one's
A little girl asked why one butterfly didn’t have eyes and I said it did, but they were black … like this one’s
More flying critters
More flying critters …
Butterfly on foliage
… and another …
A butterfly on a flowering plant
… and another
Mating pipevine swallowtails; note the top one's wing is so battered you can see the yellow of the marigold through it
Mating pipevine swallowtails; note the top one’s wing is so battered you can see the yellow of the marigold through it
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Butterfly Diary 2015, Week 5: A photo gallery

My favorite photo of the week, a paper kite hanging from its chrysalis.
A spicebush swallowtail feeds on a zinnia.
A spicebush swallowtail feeds on a zinnia.

A sunny day meant lots of emergence for Butterflies in Bloom this week. When the temperature hit 85 in the Conservatory, the vents opened, so keeping the floors wet was a challenge this week. I still managed to squeeze in a few photos, and stayed after my shift to try for a few more.

This shows the underside of the wing of the butterfly pictured at top, the spicebush swallowtail. This one is hanging in our “nursery” Norfolk pine for some extra attention and drying time.
This shows the underside of the wing of the butterfly pictured at top, the spicebush swallowtail. This one is hanging in our “nursery” Norfolk pine for some extra attention and drying time.

 

A Mexican bluewing still in the chrysalis case. The dark spots on the TENA pad are meconium, or waste fluid, that the butterflies expel as they unfurl and flap their wings to dry while hanging. We put pads under each chrysalis shelf and spray them heavily to boost the humidity in the case.
A Mexican bluewing still in the chrysalis case. The dark spots on the TENA pad are meconium, or waste fluid, that the butterflies expel as they unfurl and flap their wings to dry while hanging. We put pads under each chrysalis shelf and spray them heavily with water to boost the humidity in the case.

 

A chrysalis for one of the owl butterflies, I believe the giant owl. See how it’s transparent at the top? The Dow Gardens entomologist, Elly Maxwell Grosteffon, said this one likely would be emerging within the next day.
A chrysalis for one of the owl butterflies, I believe the giant owl. See how it’s transparent at the top? The Dow Gardens entomologist, Elly Maxwell Grosteffon, said this one likely would be emerging within the next day.

 

I reached out to Elly for help when I couldn’t identify this while editing and she told me it is a lacewing. Many photos show the tops of butterfly wings, so identifying by the undersides is harder. It gets trickier still because so many varieties have duller undersides for camouflage, such as the popular blue morpho, which is brown with a line of large spots on the undersides, but a brilliant blue on the wing tops. The blue morphos also are notoriously uncooperative for cameras.
I reached out to Elly for help when I couldn’t identify this while editing and she told me it is a lacewing. Many photos show the tops of butterfly wings, so identifying by the undersides is harder. It gets trickier still because so many varieties have duller undersides for camouflage, such as the popular blue morpho, which is brown with a line of large spots on the undersides, but a brilliant blue on the wing tops. The blue morphos also are notoriously uncooperative for cameras.

 

A small postman.
A small postman.

 

A giant swallowtail.
A giant swallowtail.

 

A queen, which is the type, not the gender. It is somewhat battered, likely from courting rituals. I find the orange Julias and zebra longwings especially amorous, and sometimes gently shoo them out of the nursery when they try to mate with a new insect, such as the orange sulphur that crashed with its wings furled and had trouble hanging onto the tree at all. Sadly, it did not survive.
A queen, which is the type, not the gender. It is somewhat battered, likely from courting rituals. I find the orange Julias and zebra longwings especially amorous, and sometimes gently shoo them out of the nursery when they try to mate with a new insect, such as the orange sulphur that crashed with its wings furled and had trouble hanging onto the tree at all. Sadly, it did not survive.

 

A pipevine swallowtail.
Above, a pipevine swallowtail. Below, my favorite photo of the week, a paper kite hanging from its chrysalis.

My favorite photo of the week, a paper kite hanging from its chrysalis.