Butterfly Diary 2015, Week 4: Winter gives way to spring

A newly emerged buckeye. While many have a mostly brown background, some breeders emphasize colorings that are purple or green, like this one.
A newly emerged buckeye. While many have a mostly brown background, some breeders emphasize colorings that are purple or green, like this one.

A sunny day in the Dow Gardens Conservatory meant lots of butterflies emerging this week. Visitors still were frustrated by the blue morphos, which seem to know when a camera isn’t ready to capture the striking blue topsides of their wings, and instead present the interestingly patterned but quite brown undersides.

I felt their pain. Among the varieties I saw but didn’t get were a queen (my own fault, I put one in the nursery tree but forgot to shoot it), Mexican bluewing, tailed jay and the tiny but striking Atala hairstreak.

Of course, the climate indoors and that outdoors were quite different.

The waterfall near the entrance is much more liquid now.
The waterfall near the entrance is much more liquid now.

 

As the stream by the Conservatory thaws, multiple layers of leaves that were frozen into it are revealed.
As the stream by the Conservatory thaws, multiple layers of leaves that were frozen into it are revealed.

The waning days of winter showed most of the snow pack gone, but the “pond ice is unstable” sign remains up to warn visitors.

The frogs LOVE the butterfly exhibit. It is tasty.
The frogs LOVE the butterfly exhibit. It is tasty.

Back indoors, one of the frogs came out to sun itself, which was fun to point out to the kids. Usually the frogs stay in the pond and are much harder to spot, although “Can you find the frogs?” is a great question to ask kids who can’t seem to settle down.

Among the largest babies of Butterflies in Bloom are the giant owls, below. The exhibit continues through April 19.

A giant owl on my hand, for scale. This variety has noticeable weight to it, and scritchy feet.
A giant owl on my hand, for scale. This variety has noticeable weight to it, and scritchy feet.

 

Another giant owl.
Another giant owl.
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